Tinius Olsen

1065 Easton Rd
Horsham,  PA  19044

United States
215-675-7100
http://www.tiniusolsen.com
  • Booth: A5057


 Press Releases

  • Tinius Olsen has helped one of the leading Technical Colleges in America, the Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, to up-grade and further develop its materials testing laboratory. 

    This is the culmination of a partnership between the two organisations that goes back to the establishment of the College in 1969, as Mike DeVore, Professor & Program Chair of the Mechanical Engineering Technology & Welding Technology Dept explains:

    “I started teaching at Cincinnati State 29 years ago and at that time we had a very old Tinius Olsen tensile test machine that still worked extremely well on a day to day basis.”   

    “Our testing lab had been in operation since almost the establishment of the school so we decided to update our lab in 1993 and, due to the reliability and generally good history that we had with the old machine, I decided to purchase another from Tinius Olsen.” 

    “I visited the factory in Pennsylvania and was very impressed with the quality of work and professionalism of the employees at the company, so we purchased our second Tinius Olsen machine, a 60L Super L Tensile Tester. Again we enjoyed great service with the machine until the controls unfortunately failed last year.”

    “Fortunately, we had obtained funding to upgrade our materials test lab with all new equipment and it was a relatively easy decision to once again look to Tinius Olsen, thanks in the main to the great experience we have had with the company over the years. It was also important to me to try to purchase American made equipment, whenever possible.”

    The machines installed at the Colleges’ testing lab are a 10,000 In/lb Bench Top Torsion Tester, a Model IT406 Pendulum Impact tester, four Rockwell and one Brinnel Hardness Testing machines, as well as retro-fitting the 60L Super L. This has resulted in a substantial investment by the College into their state of the art testing laboratory, which should see at least another 30 years problem free use.

    “The new equipment is used in several courses within our Mechanical Engineering Technology, Welding Technology, and Civil Engineering Technology programs. The primary use is in our MET 140 Engineering Materials course where our students spend the semester doing destructive testing.”  

    “Between the three programs we have over 500 hundred students - all of which will use this lab at some point in their curriculum.  The tests we currently perform within the lab include Tensile, Bend, Hardness, Torsion and Impact testing as well as Heat treating.”

    Cincinnati State Technical and Community College, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, provides student-focused, accessible, high-quality technical and general education, academic transfer, experiential and cooperative education and workforce development.

    The College offers more than 130 associate degree and certificate programs through its four academic divisions and the Workforce Development Center.

    “We have a long history with Tinius Olsen. We have used their material testing equipment for nearly 50 years here at Cincinnati State and intend to keep the relationship intact for years to come. They are a great American company and we are proud to use their equipment to educate our students,” continued Mr DeVore.

    “Through the use of our Tinius Olsen equipment we are able to prepare our students to go out into industry with a thorough knowledge of material testing. Tinius Olsen test equipment is used by many of our employers and they appreciate the fact that our students are learning to use industry standard equipment.”

    For further information contact Richard Coombs at richard.coombs@tiniusolsen.co.uk

  • The Tinius Olsen Epsilon ONE is a new optical non-contact extensometer performing high-accuracy, high-resolution, non-contacting axial strain and displacement measurement, using video to measure strain. It is unique in its ease of use for efficient materials testing.

    It is suitable for testing high-modulus materials such as metals and composites and higher-elongation materials, thin or delicate specimens, cyclic fatigue, strain controlled testing, deflectometer applications and measuring crack opening displacements.

    Class-leading accuracy and resolution are achieved by Epsilon’s comprehensive optical path optimisation, thanks to a unification of several optical technologies and signal processing algorithms. 

    Its ultra-high camera resolution, real-time data rates up to 3000Hz, minimisation of optical error sources and signal processing techniques provide high strain resolution and accuracy with the lowest noise.

    Strain or extension is measured and output in real time. Epsilon ONE’s high resolution and ISO 0,5 / ASTM B-1 accuracy classes make it suitable for non-contact measurement of a wide range of strain values, from very small strains required to measure modulus of metals, composites, ceramics and CMCs through elastomers and everything in between.

    “It is so straight forward to use, perfect for busy Labs. Simply place the specimen in the testing machine, swipe your hand to break the light path to zero and start, that’s it.” said Martin Wheeler, Director of Sales and Business Development at Tinius Olsen.

    “Epsilon ONE doesn’t have to be started and stopped for each specimen like most video extensometers and DIC systems, with Laser-Assist Alignment System providing an instant alignment and distance spot check. This projects pre-aligned laser lines on the specimen before the test to reveal any misalignment. 

    “During the test, high precision tele-centric lenses eliminate errors due to out-of-plane movements on low strain materials and components.”

    “All these factors result in Epsilon ONE being equipped with the accuracy and fine resolution required to measure modulus, offset yield, stress-strain curves and strain at failure for all high-modulus materials.”

    Many applications involve specimens that straighten or grips that are free to align under tensile loading. Unlike conventional lenses, tele-centric lenses are insensitive to potential inaccuracies caused by these out-of-plane motions. With a tele-centric lens, the image of the test specimen seen by the camera’s sensor is the same size even if the specimen moves closer to the Optics Package or further away.

    This gives the benefit of maintaining full strain measurement accuracy, even if the specimen or grips move “out of plane” during the test. Conventional ento-centric lenses, which are widely used by other manufacturers of non-contact extensometers, cannot match this performance.

    “One of the biggest barriers to widespread use of non-contact extensometers to overcome are too many steps when using them. Epsilon ONE is always running and measuring strain or searching for marks using its Automatic Mark Detection. As soon as marks are detected, Epsilon ONE is measuring strain in real time,” continued Martin.

    “Most materials testing technologies perform as certified day in day out. What sets the Tinius Olsen system apart is its ability to drive up productivity. Seconds per test adds up to weeks in a year - and that equates to money!”

    The Tinius Olsen Epsilon One sets up for new specimen types in minutes, requires very little training or skill to use, and fits all models of materials testing machines. We strongly believe the Epsilon One is a real step evolution in the world of materials testing.”

    For further information on Epsilon One contact Richard Coombes on 01737 765001, email: sales@tiniusolsen.co.uk or visit: https://www.tiniusolsen.com/tinius-olsen-products/automated-system

  • Successful manufacturing relies on quality and productivity. Testing machines are used to demonstrate the quality of raw materials such as steel alloys, composites, plastics and rubber as well as components including medical devices, packagingmaterials and fasteners. Manufacturing processes today are typically automated to a greater or lesser extent, although the quality process is often manual.

    This is generally time consuming, involving entering reference data, performing test procedures, reporting on the results, preparing the testing machine, starting the test, qualifying and accepting the results and appending comments before removing the materials. 

    Historically, materials testing has been an operator using single or multiple stations. This can be uneconomical in terms of operator time where speed is crucial – for example in testing threaded fasteners for the aerospace industry, testing is required 24 hours a day. 

    Drug delivery in the biomedical industry is one sector that could benefit from automation. Drug delivery tests are performed on three individual stations with multiples of those stations, lab operators working 24 hours a day loading, testing and removing the parts – this can now be automated.

    However, there is a discrepancy in manufacturing where businesses are happy to pay for the automated manufacturing of products. The testing of the materials used in the products is still based in the domain of manual workers – no matter the size of the business or its industry. The high cost of introducing automated testing into the manufacturing process, and whether a business believes it has the volume of samples to justify them, has been a barrier to smaller companies considering spending the money to supplant human operators carrying out material tests with robots.

    This has resulted in the development of scalable automated testing systems, which can offer manufacturing businesses an alternative to manual testing, with long-term benefits. 

    Figures by Tinius Olsen, UK, claim there are gains to be made, noting that an operator can spend 8.4 hours per 24-hour day watching and waiting for tests to run. A robotic system can run all day and night, leading to weekly gains of 59 hours against an operator, amounting to 127 days over the course of a year. This means more tests can be undertaken with increased productivity. 

    The technology can be designed, developed and scaled up or down to fit a business’ needs and be versatile to accommodate any material or components. The idea is it can run single or multiple tasks at any size or combination. Creating a scalable building block approach allows for systems from low force applications of just a few newtons to very high force applications of a thousand kilonewtons or more.

    Olsen’s first machine, built in 1891, the Little Giant, was the first to combine and accurately perform tensile, transverse and compression tests in one instrument

    housed in a single frame. This same design approach is now seeing developments in fully automated testing, whereby multiple machines can be placed into a cell with a single robot control. This can feed multiple materials carrying out tests including hardness, tensile strength and flexibility.

    Accelerating automation

    Automation has crept into materials testing, but it is often limited to devices that hold the testing specimens, such as in semi-automation around heavy metal testing or systems, usually testing rigid raw materials in tensile only parameters. As part of an automated testing solution, a number of options exist in terms of different tests performed at a range of capacities. The different testing options include not just a horizontal or vertical tensile test but also a flexural test, a hardness test and/or any other type of physical testing equipment that can export test data.

    When companies review automated processes in terms of manufacturing, they should apply the same business rationale to their quality lab. Often, they believe it can't be done, or there's not enough throughput to justify its introduction. But, by taking into consideration the time it takes to do a test and the need for repeatability – an eight-hour shift, six days a week requirement – significant money can be made and not just saved by automating the quality control.

    Automation has been incorporated into a number of testing machines including the tensile tester – it has either a vertical orientation or a horizontal orientation, consisting of an electromechanical tensile tester, which is available in a selection of maximum test capacities. Testing in the horizontal plane allows the use of a precision extensometer that takes advantage of gravity to rest on

    and follow the specimen as it is pulled to break. Using air bearings and a non-slip finish on the knife-edges of the extensometer achieves Class A accuracy.

    The primary test station features, for example, a 600kN test station. Using open front crossheads on the tester allows the robot to place the sample into the tester and the hydraulic grips can be easily closed. Extensometry is achieved using either standard non-contacting extensometers or an automatic clip on extensometer. The advantage of an integrated and robotic test system is the ability to test a large number of specimens leaving operators available to perform other types of quality tests.

    Large amounts of materials are stored in a way that allows easy access for the robotic arm to grab the next specimen. These storage systems can be simple specimen racks that are arranged in an arc around the robot arm. The robot moves around to pick the next specimen, or multiple large storage racks are pneumatically moved into position so that the robot returns to the same place to collect the next specimen.

    Gathering data

    Once a material has been selected, it is important to know as much as possible and each should be identified, most commonly with a barcode. The barcode holds information about the material and can be read into the testing machine software. Alternatively, the barcode can trigger an import of data into this software. Information may include identifiers, test parameters, result limits or any other relevant data. The robot can be programmed to move the material from station to station, rotating the material to be loaded either horizontally, vertically or at any angle in between, depending on the requirements. It controls the movement of the specimen through the different testing routines, but it also listens to input from other external testers and will place these results into a summary report.

    Businesses will benefit from the productivity and repeatability of automation – the machine can be used every hour of every week. With optimisation, speed, efficiency and cost at the centre of automated solutions, robotics may hold the answer in future testing facilities.

    Martin Wheeler is Director of Sales and Business Development at Tinius Olsen, UK, specialising in the manufacture and supply of materials testing machines and analysis systems for raw materials such as metals, composites, plastics, textiles and/or components for automotive, aerospace, medical devices, fasteners, rebar, cables and packaging systems.

    For further information on the VEM Series contact Richard

    Coombes on 01737 765001, email: sales@tiniusolsen.co.uk


 Products

  • Tinius Olsen Epsilon One Non-Contact Extensometer
    The Tinius Olsen Epsilon ONE is a new optical non-contact extensometer performing high-accuracy, high-resolution, non-contacting axial strain and displacement measurement using video to measure strain. It is unique in its ease of use....
     

  • The Tinius Olsen Epsilon One is a new optical non-contact extensometer performing high-accuracy, high-resolution, non-contacting axial strain and displacement measurement using video to measure strain. It is unique in its ease of use.

    It is suitable for testing high-modulus materials such as metals and composites and higher-elongation materials, thin or delicate specimens, cyclic fatigue, strain controlled testing, deflectometer applications and measuring crack opening displacements.

    Class-leading accuracy and resolution are achieved by Epsilon’s comprehensive optical path optimisation, unifying several optical technologies and signal processing algorithms.

    Its ultra-high camera resolution, real-time data rates up to 3000Hz, minimization of optical error sources, and signal processing techniques provide high strain resolution and accuracy with the lowest noise.

    Strain or extension is measured and output in real time. Epsilon One’s high resolution and ISO 0,5

    / ASTM B-1 accuracy classes make it suitable for non-contact measurement of a wide range of strain values, from metals, composites, through elastomers and everything in between.

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